Automatic life cycle management

These examples are for illustrative purposes only and are not intended to serve as an answer key.

Data examples of title statistics


Title statistics are the focal point of automatic life cycle management. Two examples of operational data and the resultant title statistics are reviewed below.

Review of actual data for the title “Farlig fortid - 51606175” [Dangerous history].

The number of item days is an expression of the number of copies of the title that have been in stock over the 180-day period included in the calculations. The stock may have changed over the course of the period, so each item is counted for the days that it has been in stock.

There are currently 84 copies. All of them have an acquisition date prior to the beginning of the period (09/10/2016), so the result is 84 * 180 = 15,120. During the period, there were 3 additional copies that were discarded on 01/19/2017 and 12/06/2016 (2 pcs.) - an additional 305 item days. Altogether 15,425 but since IMMS counts fractional days (down to the second), it ends up as 15,339 item days. Periods in which an item was not a part of the stock (e.g., discarded) are therefore deducted.

The average number of copies in stock is calculated as the number of item days divided by the length of the period. 15,339 item days in a period of 720 days is 85.22 (rounded off) - in other words, higher than the current quantity of 84.

The number of loan days is the total number of days items have been on loan during the period. Each item is counted in the number of days (internally calculated in seconds) in which the item has been on loan (incl. any holds). Two items on loan for 7 days would correspond to 1 item on loan for 14 days - both equal 14 loan days. In this case, most copies, including the now discarded ones, have been on loan multiple times - a total Number of loans (only reservable items) of 362 , so it becomes a total of 7,948 days.

The average number of copies on loan is calculated as the number of loan days divided by the length of the period: 7,948 / 180 = 44.16 (rounded off).

The average circulation percentage is calculated as the number of loan days divided by the number of item days: 7,948 / 15,339 = 51.82%. This provides an indication of how well the stock has been “utilized”.

The adjusted circulation percentage compares the average number of copies on loan with the current stock: 44.16 / 84 = 52.57%. This tells us a little bit about the extent to which the current stock agrees with historical loan patterns. This number is the main target when it comes to, e.g., weeding rules. As mentioned, in this case, the stock was previously weeded via the 3 copies that were discarded, thus the adjusted circulation percentage is a little bit higher than the average circulation percentage.

There were altogether 362 loans, where 35 occurred due to holds. This means that the average Percentage of loans based on holds/reservations is 9.67%


Life cycle simulator

There are 84 relevant copies.

None of the copies are periodicals.

At least 51% of the items must have the same value in order for that value to be used for the title. This corresponds to 43 copies of this title.

Copy information summarized for the title:

Additional title information:

Summary of current copies:

The title statistics are calculated going back 180 days (09/10/2016 - 03/08/2017).

History of the items (only lendable items are counted):


Review of actual data for the title “Bundet af blodet - 26278422” [A question of blood].

The number of item days is an expression of the number of copies of the title that have been in stock over the 720-day period included in the calculations. The stock may have changed over the course of the period, so each item is counted for the days that it has been in stock.

There are 3 copies. They all begin on 02/17/2016 since that was the day when IMMS initially extracted the data from the LMS. It is now 370 days later. 3 * 370 is 1,110, but since IMMS counts fractional days (down to the second), it ends up as 1,108. Periods in which an item was not a part of the stock (e.g., discarded) are therefore deducted.

The average number of copies in stock is calculated as the number of item days divided by the length of the period. 1,108 item days in a period of 720 days is 1.54 (rounded off).

The average stock (as far as IMMS knows) over the last 720 days is not accurate in this case where IMMS has only run for 370 days. It may therefore be a good idea to adjust the “Number of days looked at retroactively” in the general system parameters downward.

Since none of the 3 items have been loaned during the period, the rest of the review becomes fairly pointless for this title.

The number of loan days is the total number of days items have been on loan during the period. Each item is counted in the number of days (in fact, seconds) in which the item has been on loan (incl. any holds). Two items on loan for 7 days would correspond to 1 item on loan for 14 days - both equal 14 loan days.

The average number of copies on loan is calculated as the number of loan days divided by the length of the period. Once again, it is misleading to calculate over a period that is longer than the historical period covered in IMMS.

The average circulation percentage is calculated as the number of loan days divided by the number of item days. Since only the days when the items were actually in stock are looked at, this figure is in fact meaningful even if the period is longer than the history in IMMS. This provides an indication of how well the stock has been “utilized”.

The adjusted circulation percentage compares the average number of copies on loan with the current stock. This tells us a little bit about the extent to which the current stock agrees with historical loan patterns. This number is the main target when it comes to, e.g., weeding.

Life cycle simulator

There are 3 relevant copies.

None of the copies are periodicals.

At least 51% of the items must have the same value in order for that value to be used for the title. This corresponds to 2 copies of this title.

Copy information summarized for the title:

Additional title information:

Summary of current copies:

The title statistics are calculated going back 720 days (03/06/2015 - 02/21/2017).

History of the items (only lendable items are counted):

Simulation with the title "Vain seksiƤ - 2041195".

Life cycle simulator

Title id: 2041195

Title: Vain seksiƤ

Author:

Note: The simulation below aims to illustrate how the automatic life cycle management handles the given title. The simulation does not perform any events on the title, and the calculations are carried out despite the title being locked for automatic life cycle events, and despite automatic life cycle events being turned off.

The title is NOT locked for automatic life cycle events.

There are 3 relevant copies.

No copies are periodicals.

Minimum 51 % of the items must have the same value, in order for the value to be applied to the title. This amounts to 2 copies of this title. Copy information summarized for the title:

Additional title information:

Summary of current copies:

Title statistics are calculated 180 days in the past (03.04.2019 - 29.09.2019). Item history (only lendable items are included)):

The adjusted circulation percentage compares the average number of copies on loan with the current stock. This tells us a little bit about the extent to which the current stock agrees with historical loan patterns. This number is the main target when it comes to, e.g., weeding

Match with life cycle rules:

The title matches the following life cycle rules:

The matching life cycle rule with the highest priority is "Lyngsoe test strategy".

The rule does not assign a strategy.

The rule indicates weeding.

Weeding will take place until at least one of the following conditions are met:

Number of copies to discard is 1 copies.

An item must be selected for discard.

The items adhering to the conditions of the rule are prioritized according to the following criteria:

The first item on the list (30091043923336) has the highest priority, and was selected to be discarded.

The rule does not indicate replenishment.